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syrians make a home in kitchener one year latersyrians make a home in kitchener one year latersyrians make a home in kitchener one year later

by:TBCZ     2020-03-24
KITCHENER —
When the children were sitting around the TV in a corner of Hamoud alchek\'s living room, they screamed happily. His 19-month-
The old daughter Rimas is pushing a plastic toy shopping cart nearby.
Hamoud and his wife, Varada Ramadan, had a good life and a year later they walked out of a minivan and came to the snow front lawn of their new kitchen home.
In retrospect, Hamoud said it felt like a surreal dream at that moment.
They came out of the war.
Syria is in trouble as a Lebanese refugee.
Now his family is finally feeling safe.
It will take a while for it to sink in, he said through the translator.
The hardwood floors in the Hamoud living room are covered with soft mismatched carpets.
He sat on a sofa surrounded by several people who sponsored Alcheikhs a year ago.
His sponsors also happen to be his neighbors, and now they are like family members.
\"We were lucky that our family moved to our community,\" said Sal spidale, one of the kitchen residents who funded Hamoud and his family.
Last year, Spitale and a group of his neighbors joined forces in the name of Kitchener\'s core neighbor to embrace refugees and raise funds to bring refugee families to Canada.
In just a few weeks of last January, they raised $28,000.
When members find a rented house near their own kitchen, the eager group is lucky.
For the arrival of the family, they store the donated toys and furniture in time.
They partnered with the Mennonite Central Committee to use their mixed visa program to sponsor a family of seven in Syria with five children under the age of 10.
Many sponsors have children of the same age as Alcheikhs.
They went to the same primary school and established a special friendship.
It was the children who helped bridge the gap between this Syrian family and the Canadian family and helped them come here.
\"There\'s a comfortable level there,\" says one of the sponsors, Deborah Robinson . \".
\"It\'s amazing how children cross the language barrier.
\"In the first few weeks of the family, sponsors walked to school --
Children aged Alcheikh go to school with their own children.
They go hiking on weekends, from sledding in winter to Football League in summer.
\"It makes it easier for us to get along because we all have young children,\" Robinson said . \".
\"It is a relief, because it is children who break the deadlock.
\"While adults sit in another part of the living room sipping tea made during Ramadan, Alcheikh children chat with some of their new friends in English.
They moved upstairs from the front of the TV, and the sound of laughter and joy disappeared.
Hamoud said it was much easier for children to adapt to the new environment.
Hamud and Ramadan don\'t have to worry about them anymore.
He added with a smile that I am more worried about myself now.
The couple went to English classes on a regular basis and tried to practice every day.
Hamoud still needs to improve his English so he can practice his trade in Canada.
Back in Syria, Hamoud is a heating and refrigeration technician.
In Saraqeb, his hometown, he has his own businesses to provide these services.
This is a small city with about 35,000 people south of Aleppo.
It is also a conflict-torn place since 2012.
Hamoud said Syria is beautiful.
They moved to Lebanon to avoid the conflict, and Hamoud worked hard to support his brothers and sisters, his parents and his own big family.
Coming to Canada is the opposite of living in Lebanon.
He said that we are not welcome in Lebanon.
Now, he is relieved to be able to watch his child grow up in a safe, educated place.
\"They are eager to learn and adapt and they want to be productive,\" Spitale said . \".
When one of the group-
The commitment to financial support for the Alcheikh family is over and they will continue to help as best they can.
\"We\'re not going anywhere, they\'re our neighbors,\" Spitale added . \".
For sponsors and their own family, having Alcheikhs on the street was a great experience.
\"It\'s a huge relief for me to be able to do something tangible to help me,\" Robinson said . \".
This helps them teach their children empathy.
Alisa MacBride Smith, who is also a sponsor, said: \"This allows us to have a conversation with our children . \".
It\'s hard for children to understand why so many Syrians have to flee their homes, she said.
\"Hopefully this will be a great learning opportunity for them,\" Spitale added . \".
\"We realize that this is the mark on our children and is part of something bigger than them.
\"Last weekend, since the arrival of Alcheikhs, sponsors organized a small party to celebrate the year.
The next challenge for Alcheikhs Hammoud is to thank the sponsors for everything they have done for his family, but he is concerned that his mother is left in Lebanon.
They applied for refugee status but his mother was excluded, he said.
His father recently died of cancer and now Hamoud\'s mother, Tiba, is alone.
Hamoud said she is very important to the children and they need her.
Sponsoring groups are also trying to bring the International Bar Association to Canada.
This means a second round of financing and complex paperwork.
Spitale admits that people feel \"a little tired\" but they have been trying to bring the International Bar Association to Canada since June.
Now that they know that UNHCR has received her application, all they can do is wait patiently and try to raise more money.
Hamoud just got out of the van (last January)
He is worried about his mother, and he is worried that he wants to bring her here . \"
Hamoud said she would help their five energetic children at home.
Not only that, he added, the children miss her.
The organization needs to raise $15,000 to bring the International Bar Association to Canada.
So far, the group has raised more than $7,700 through the crowd.
Call you on the Fund website.
Shaxin brothers shaxin has turned the kitchen in the city center into his new home.
A year ago, he left a plane, a tired and anxious Syrian refugee. Now the 33-year-
Old works in a local Middle Eastern fast food restaurant.
He is learning to take the qualification exam so that he can practice the law in Canada, and just before he goes home for the war, he trains for the profession in the UK --torn Syria.
Things are looking for Shahin and his younger brother, Ferras, who came to Canada last year, a few days apart.
But it was not an easy adjustment for the two brothers, who were privately sponsored by their aunt, a kitchen resident.
\"The biggest challenge is to find a job,\" said Sha Hin . \" He said while drinking coffee at Tim Houghton, a kitchen attendant in the city center.
His first job was to work as a cashier at a local restaurant.
When he talked about how tricky it was at first, he laughed now.
\"I will stare at a coin and think \'is this a dime or a five-cent coin? \'
People will look at me very interesting.
But he learned quickly.
\"They are very good,\" he added . \".
A year later, the two brothers were reunited with their parents and sisters.
They arrived less than two months ago.
This is an opportunity for families to start over, says Sha Hin. His 16-year-
My sister is in high school.
His 28-year-old brother Feras is back in grade 12, working in a restaurant and applying to universities and colleges for mechanical engineering.
Ferras was interrupted by heavy bombing during his university education in Damascus.
But the shaxin family faces more challenges. The two-
The bedroom apartment where the brothers live is now packed with three more people.
They want to move to a house in the city center so they can walk to work and school.
His legal research has also stalled as legal books are too expensive.
His parents are working hard to learn English and he is worried about their progress.
But one thing he must know is that he doesn\'t want to go back to Syria.
\"I have memories of childhood, they are lovely,\" said Sha Hin . \".
He has many relatives in Syria, and even in the unusually cold winter of the year, they often live in an unstable environment with no gas or electricity.
In Syria, security means \"this moment,\" Shahin said \".
But after eight years of uncertainty, he moved from country to country, just wanting some peace and stability.
He\'s here.
Alatif @ therecord.
Com, Weibo: @ LatifRecord kidina-
When the children were sitting around the TV in a corner of Hamoud alchek\'s living room, they screamed happily. His 19-month-
The old daughter Rimas is pushing a plastic toy shopping cart nearby.
Hamoud and his wife, Varada Ramadan, had a good life and a year later they walked out of a minivan and came to the snow front lawn of their new kitchen home.
In retrospect, Hamoud said it felt like a surreal dream at that moment.
They came out of the war.
Syria is in trouble as a Lebanese refugee.
Now his family is finally feeling safe.
It will take a while for it to sink in, he said through the translator.
The hardwood floors in the Hamoud living room are covered with soft mismatched carpets.
He sat on a sofa surrounded by several people who sponsored Alcheikhs a year ago.
His sponsors also happen to be his neighbors, and now they are like family members.
\"We were lucky that our family moved to our community,\" said Sal spidale, one of the kitchen residents who funded Hamoud and his family.
Last year, Spitale and a group of his neighbors joined forces in the name of Kitchener\'s core neighbor to embrace refugees and raise funds to bring refugee families to Canada.
In just a few weeks of last January, they raised $28,000.
When members find a rented house near their own kitchen, the eager group is lucky.
For the arrival of the family, they store the donated toys and furniture in time.
They partnered with the Mennonite Central Committee to use their mixed visa program to sponsor a family of seven in Syria with five children under the age of 10.
Many sponsors have children of the same age as Alcheikhs.
They went to the same primary school and established a special friendship.
It was the children who helped bridge the gap between this Syrian family and the Canadian family and helped them come here.
\"There\'s a comfortable level there,\" says one of the sponsors, Deborah Robinson . \".
\"It\'s amazing how children cross the language barrier.
\"In the first few weeks of the family, sponsors walked to school --
Children aged Alcheikh go to school with their own children.
They go hiking on weekends, from sledding in winter to Football League in summer.
\"It makes it easier for us to get along because we all have young children,\" Robinson said . \".
\"It is a relief, because it is children who break the deadlock.
\"While adults sit in another part of the living room sipping tea made during Ramadan, Alcheikh children chat with some of their new friends in English.
They moved upstairs from the front of the TV, and the sound of laughter and joy disappeared.
Hamoud said it was much easier for children to adapt to the new environment.
Hamud and Ramadan don\'t have to worry about them anymore.
He added with a smile that I am more worried about myself now.
The couple went to English classes on a regular basis and tried to practice every day.
Hamoud still needs to improve his English so he can practice his trade in Canada.
Back in Syria, Hamoud is a heating and refrigeration technician.
In Saraqeb, his hometown, he has his own businesses to provide these services.
This is a small city with about 35,000 people south of Aleppo.
It is also a conflict-torn place since 2012.
Hamoud said Syria is beautiful.
They moved to Lebanon to avoid the conflict, and Hamoud worked hard to support his brothers and sisters, his parents and his own big family.
Coming to Canada is the opposite of living in Lebanon.
He said that we are not welcome in Lebanon.
Now, he is relieved to be able to watch his child grow up in a safe, educated place.
\"They are eager to learn and adapt and they want to be productive,\" Spitale said . \".
When one of the group-
The commitment to financial support for the Alcheikh family is over and they will continue to help as best they can.
\"We\'re not going anywhere, they\'re our neighbors,\" Spitale added . \".
For sponsors and their own family, having Alcheikhs on the street was a great experience.
\"It\'s a huge relief for me to be able to do something tangible to help me,\" Robinson said . \".
This helps them teach their children empathy.
Alisa MacBride Smith, who is also a sponsor, said: \"This allows us to have a conversation with our children . \".
It\'s hard for children to understand why so many Syrians have to flee their homes, she said.
\"Hopefully this will be a great learning opportunity for them,\" Spitale added . \".
\"We realize that this is the mark on our children and is part of something bigger than them.
\"Last weekend, since the arrival of Alcheikhs, sponsors organized a small party to celebrate the year.
The next challenge for Alcheikhs Hammoud is to thank the sponsors for everything they have done for his family, but he is concerned that his mother is left in Lebanon.
They applied for refugee status but his mother was excluded, he said.
His father recently died of cancer and now Hamoud\'s mother, Tiba, is alone.
Hamoud said she is very important to the children and they need her.
Sponsoring groups are also trying to bring the International Bar Association to Canada.
This means a second round of financing and complex paperwork.
Spitale admits that people feel \"a little tired\" but they have been trying to bring the International Bar Association to Canada since June.
Now that they know that UNHCR has received her application, all they can do is wait patiently and try to raise more money.
Hamoud just got out of the van (last January)
He is worried about his mother, and he is worried that he wants to bring her here . \"
Hamoud said she would help their five energetic children at home.
Not only that, he added, the children miss her.
The organization needs to raise $15,000 to bring the International Bar Association to Canada.
So far, the group has raised more than $7,700 through the crowd.
Call you on the Fund website.
Shaxin brothers shaxin has turned the kitchen in the city center into his new home.
A year ago, he left a plane, a tired and anxious Syrian refugee. Now the 33-year-
Old works in a local Middle Eastern fast food restaurant.
He is learning to take the qualification exam so that he can practice the law in Canada, and just before he goes home for the war, he trains for the profession in the UK --torn Syria.
Things are looking for Shahin and his younger brother, Ferras, who came to Canada last year, a few days apart.
But it was not an easy adjustment for the two brothers, who were privately sponsored by their aunt, a kitchen resident.
\"The biggest challenge is to find a job,\" said Sha Hin . \" He said while drinking coffee at Tim Houghton, a kitchen attendant in the city center.
His first job was to work as a cashier at a local restaurant.
When he talked about how tricky it was at first, he laughed now.
\"I will stare at a coin and think \'is this a dime or a five-cent coin? \'
People will look at me very interesting.
But he learned quickly.
\"They are very good,\" he added . \".
A year later, the two brothers were reunited with their parents and sisters.
They arrived less than two months ago.
This is an opportunity for families to start over, says Sha Hin. His 16-year-
My sister is in high school.
His 28-year-old brother Feras is back in grade 12, working in a restaurant and applying to universities and colleges for mechanical engineering.
Ferras was interrupted by heavy bombing during his university education in Damascus.
But the shaxin family faces more challenges. The two-
The bedroom apartment where the brothers live is now packed with three more people.
They want to move to a house in the city center so they can walk to work and school.
His legal research has also stalled as legal books are too expensive.
His parents are working hard to learn English and he is worried about their progress.
But one thing he must know is that he doesn\'t want to go back to Syria.
\"I have memories of childhood, they are lovely,\" said Sha Hin . \".
He has many relatives in Syria, and even in the unusually cold winter of the year, they often live in an unstable environment with no gas or electricity.
In Syria, security means \"this moment,\" Shahin said \".
But after eight years of uncertainty, he moved from country to country, just wanting some peace and stability.
He\'s here.
Alatif @ therecord.
Com, Weibo: @ LatifRecord kidina-
When the children were sitting around the TV in a corner of Hamoud alchek\'s living room, they screamed happily. His 19-month-
The old daughter Rimas is pushing a plastic toy shopping cart nearby.
Hamoud and his wife, Varada Ramadan, had a good life and a year later they walked out of a minivan and came to the snow front lawn of their new kitchen home.
In retrospect, Hamoud said it felt like a surreal dream at that moment.
They came out of the war.
Syria is in trouble as a Lebanese refugee.
Now his family is finally feeling safe.
It will take a while for it to sink in, he said through the translator.
The hardwood floors in the Hamoud living room are covered with soft mismatched carpets.
He sat on a sofa surrounded by several people who sponsored Alcheikhs a year ago.
His sponsors also happen to be his neighbors, and now they are like family members.
\"We were lucky that our family moved to our community,\" said Sal spidale, one of the kitchen residents who funded Hamoud and his family.
Last year, Spitale and a group of his neighbors joined forces in the name of Kitchener\'s core neighbor to embrace refugees and raise funds to bring refugee families to Canada.
In just a few weeks of last January, they raised $28,000.
When members find a rented house near their own kitchen, the eager group is lucky.
For the arrival of the family, they store the donated toys and furniture in time.
They partnered with the Mennonite Central Committee to use their mixed visa program to sponsor a family of seven in Syria with five children under the age of 10.
Many sponsors have children of the same age as Alcheikhs.
They went to the same primary school and established a special friendship.
It was the children who helped bridge the gap between this Syrian family and the Canadian family and helped them come here.
\"There\'s a comfortable level there,\" says one of the sponsors, Deborah Robinson . \".
\"It\'s amazing how children cross the language barrier.
\"In the first few weeks of the family, sponsors walked to school --
Children aged Alcheikh go to school with their own children.
They go hiking on weekends, from sledding in winter to Football League in summer.
\"It makes it easier for us to get along because we all have young children,\" Robinson said . \".
\"It is a relief, because it is children who break the deadlock.
\"While adults sit in another part of the living room sipping tea made during Ramadan, Alcheikh children chat with some of their new friends in English.
They moved upstairs from the front of the TV, and the sound of laughter and joy disappeared.
Hamoud said it was much easier for children to adapt to the new environment.
Hamud and Ramadan don\'t have to worry about them anymore.
He added with a smile that I am more worried about myself now.
The couple went to English classes on a regular basis and tried to practice every day.
Hamoud still needs to improve his English so he can practice his trade in Canada.
Back in Syria, Hamoud is a heating and refrigeration technician.
In Saraqeb, his hometown, he has his own businesses to provide these services.
This is a small city with about 35,000 people south of Aleppo.
It is also a conflict-torn place since 2012.
Hamoud said Syria is beautiful.
They moved to Lebanon to avoid the conflict, and Hamoud worked hard to support his brothers and sisters, his parents and his own big family.
Coming to Canada is the opposite of living in Lebanon.
He said that we are not welcome in Lebanon.
Now, he is relieved to be able to watch his child grow up in a safe, educated place.
\"They are eager to learn and adapt and they want to be productive,\" Spitale said . \".
When one of the group-
The commitment to financial support for the Alcheikh family is over and they will continue to help as best they can.
\"We\'re not going anywhere, they\'re our neighbors,\" Spitale added . \".
For sponsors and their own family, having Alcheikhs on the street was a great experience.
\"It\'s a huge relief for me to be able to do something tangible to help me,\" Robinson said . \".
This helps them teach their children empathy.
Alisa MacBride Smith, who is also a sponsor, said: \"This allows us to have a conversation with our children . \".
It\'s hard for children to understand why so many Syrians have to flee their homes, she said.
\"Hopefully this will be a great learning opportunity for them,\" Spitale added . \".
\"We realize that this is the mark on our children and is part of something bigger than them.
\"Last weekend, since the arrival of Alcheikhs, sponsors organized a small party to celebrate the year.
The next challenge for Alcheikhs Hammoud is to thank the sponsors for everything they have done for his family, but he is concerned that his mother is left in Lebanon.
They applied for refugee status but his mother was excluded, he said.
His father recently died of cancer and now Hamoud\'s mother, Tiba, is alone.
Hamoud said she is very important to the children and they need her.
Sponsoring groups are also trying to bring the International Bar Association to Canada.
This means a second round of financing and complex paperwork.
Spitale admits that people feel \"a little tired\" but they have been trying to bring the International Bar Association to Canada since June.
Now that they know that UNHCR has received her application, all they can do is wait patiently and try to raise more money.
Hamoud just got out of the van (last January)
He is worried about his mother, and he is worried that he wants to bring her here . \"
Hamoud said she would help their five energetic children at home.
Not only that, he added, the children miss her.
The organization needs to raise $15,000 to bring the International Bar Association to Canada.
So far, the group has raised more than $7,700 through the crowd.
Call you on the Fund website.
Shaxin brothers shaxin has turned the kitchen in the city center into his new home.
A year ago, he left a plane, a tired and anxious Syrian refugee. Now the 33-year-
Old works in a local Middle Eastern fast food restaurant.
He is learning to take the qualification exam so that he can practice the law in Canada, and just before he goes home for the war, he trains for the profession in the UK --torn Syria.
Things are looking for Shahin and his younger brother, Ferras, who came to Canada last year, a few days apart.
But it was not an easy adjustment for the two brothers, who were privately sponsored by their aunt, a kitchen resident.
\"The biggest challenge is to find a job,\" said Sha Hin . \" He said while drinking coffee at Tim Houghton, a kitchen attendant in the city center.
His first job was to work as a cashier at a local restaurant.
When he talked about how tricky it was at first, he laughed now.
\"I will stare at a coin and think \'is this a dime or a five-cent coin? \'
People will look at me very interesting.
But he learned quickly.
\"They are very good,\" he added . \".
A year later, the two brothers were reunited with their parents and sisters.
They arrived less than two months ago.
This is an opportunity for families to start over, says Sha Hin. His 16-year-
My sister is in high school.
His 28-year-old brother Feras is back in grade 12, working in a restaurant and applying to universities and colleges for mechanical engineering.
Ferras was interrupted by heavy bombing during his university education in Damascus.
But the shaxin family faces more challenges. The two-
The bedroom apartment where the brothers live is now packed with three more people.
They want to move to a house in the city center so they can walk to work and school.
His legal research has also stalled as legal books are too expensive.
His parents are working hard to learn English and he is worried about their progress.
But one thing he must know is that he doesn\'t want to go back to Syria.
\"I have memories of childhood, they are lovely,\" said Sha Hin . \".
He has many relatives in Syria, and even in the unusually cold winter of the year, they often live in an unstable environment with no gas or electricity.
In Syria, security means \"this moment,\" Shahin said \".
But after eight years of uncertainty, he moved from country to country, just wanting some peace and stability.
He\'s here.
Alatif @ therecord.
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